Smart TV vs Normal TV – Are Smart TVs Dumb?

What is a Smart TV?

Originally known as “connected TVs”, Smart TVs are types that can connect to the internet for social networking, normal browsing activity, streaming on-demand rental services, as well as playing internet music and TV stations, in addition to streaming ordinary cable or satellite TV content. The best Smart TVs offer entertainment, social networking and functional features that normal TVs don’t and in 2016 there’s a range of Smart TVs available under £500. This was definitely not the case in 2014 or 2015 in Britain.

How different are smart TVs from normal TVs?

Unlike the normal UK TV models that are based on mere integrated circuits, smart TVs run on operating system software that has pre-installed apps, although there is no standard operating system across the board. Popular UK brands Samsung, LG, Panasonic and Sony – they all have their custom built operating systems with their different layouts and usability. While traditional TV sets have a few standard inputs and output ports, the top reviewed smart TVs tend to offer more options to connect to devices. Thus almost every smart TV in UK incorporates a variety of input options including multiple HDMI and USB ports, and allows networking with a number of home devices and smartphones.

Something about smart TVs that is not found on other normal TVs in the UK is the ability to stream on-demand video services such as Hulu and Netflix. In late 2015 and early 2016, there has been popularity of these services and the debate about how people can actually reduce the cost of watching content in Britain by incorporating on-demand content into their day-to-day life.

Besides, users can browse social sites such as Facebook and Twitter through apps, thus these devices compete in that way, with the best smartphones and most powerful computers.

How do smart TVs work? Technology

  • Juggling of graphics/video processing
  • video streaming
  • managing internet connectivity
  • managing multiple screens
  • memory management

Smart TVs do all this using an integrated computer-like framework. These TVs use processors in order to handle a volume of tasks. Some Smart TVs also come with extended internal memory and external memory slots in the UK.

They also use software to allow reception and processing of complex and multiple instructions, as well as relaying back of useful feedback. The world has experienced the Full HD (1080x1920p), and Ultra HD 4K (about 4000p) screens that deliver sharper and more detailed screen images and is anticipating the 4K Blue-ray discs that are expected to deliver extra quality – more details and sharpness, but cost more.

Applications are either preinstalled or can be installed just like smartphones and computers. These applications allow watching on-demand video services and using social networking services like Twitter and Facebook. Many of these TVs come with in-built WiFi for internet connectivity, others connect to the internet using an ethernet cable. In 2016, you’ll hardly find any without WiFi capabilities.

Are they worth it? Let’s discuss pricing and features

According to Topuptv.co.uk, you can buy a 50 inch Smart TV in less than 500 pounds, which was definitely not possible in the UK earlier this year. Smart TVs offer much more content than the traditional normal TVs and are slowly becoming an integral part of modern home entertainment. However, some argue that they’re overpriced although this is changing in 2016. Smart TVs can be worth the cost especially when you consider the price of separate internet connectivity gadgets, set top boxes etc which are not required with Smart TVs. The fact that smart TVs offer more features make them acceptable at their higher costs and are better options to cable TV if your family is used to watching movies, online streaming services, occasional series and live sports.

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With all the information above, you can clearly understand why smart TVs have become so popular over the years. Their evolution has marked a turning point in the way we view tv.

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